10 Best Ways to Clear High Credit Card Debt June 4th, 2018

10 proven ways to quickly pay off credit card debt

Ready to take control of credit card debt? Relief can be achieved by anyone, even if you’re going through hard times and can barely afford the minimum payments. Inside this post, you will learn how to lower your credit card payments by up to 45%, eliminate all interest and even reduce the principal. Even if you have no income, you can eliminate your debt in six months or less.

And these are not gimmicks! These are sound and proven strategies used by the smartest and best financial gurus around the world, including guys like Dave Ramsey.

I am not talking about bankruptcy. Although bankruptcy is an option, it’s last on the list and only required for extreme circumstances. For example, if you are currently fighting multiple credit card lawsuits, a Chapter 13 bankruptcy could wipe away these lawsuits and the debts, but you are left with a bankruptcy on your credit report which you want to avoid at all costs.

Is your credit score above 700, or possibly even 800? You too will find the perfect solution within this post. The first several options explain ways to get out of debt and avoid any type of negative effect on your credit. The second half of the list below explains the hardship options and how to repair credit scores following debt relief. It’s all here, your complete blueprint to achieving credit card debt relief and ultimately, financial freedom. You must read every strategy in order to decide what your best solution is.

Did you know that your credit card debt is more expensive today than what it was a year ago? The Federal Reserve raised its benchmark interest rate four times in 2018 alone. When this benchmark interest rate goes up, within about two months after credit card interest rates also rise. Hense, credit card debt is now more expensive in 2019. Back in 2015, the average credit card interest rate was 15.7%. As of December 2018, the average credit card interest rate rose to 17.6%.

That’s scary.

How is it even legal that banks can increase the cost of something after you’ve purchased it?

If you go to Walmart and purchase a fishing pole, Walmart can’t knock on your door five years later and ask for more money for the fishing pole because they just increased the price, can they? So, how can credit card companies change the cost of your credit card after you already signed a contract with them?

Did the contract that you originally signed with the credit card company illustrate the new interest rate?

Here’s how banks get away with this, credit cards come with variable rates. Variable rates mean that the interest rates can change, depending on whether or not the Federal Reserve decides to increase its Fed Rate. The banking system and the Federal Reserve is all built in a complicated manner that most ordinary people don’t understand. These systems are created by corporate lawyers that leverage the law to benefit themselves and they call it “fine print” in your credit card agreement because that’s exactly what it is. It’s print meant to be overlooked but there to protect the banks legally.

Hence, a person can dispute a credit card debt and banks often can’t prove it’s valid. It’s hard to believe but thousands of consumers legally stop paying and walk away from credit card debt every year because banks can’t prove the debts are valid.

Close to $How Client Was Able To Get Out Of Over 20,000 in Credit Card Debt

Without further ado, here’s your blueprint to becoming credit card DEBT-FREE and all of the details that your creditors won’t reveal.

 

10 Best Ways To Clear High Credit Card Debt

1. Debt Snowball Method:

Try our new budget and snowball calculator

The debt snowball method is when you pay minimum payments on all of your credit cards besides for the one with the smallest balance. You’re going to aggressively attack that smallest debt first, paying all of your available cash flow towards it until the balance is paid in full. How fast will the debt snowball method get you out of debt? You can become debt free with the snowball method in anywhere from a few months to 5-6 years – it depends on your budget. Use this snowball calculator tool to figure out how long it will take.

Just like how a snowball accumulates snow and grows in size as you roll it, your monthly available cash flow will also grow in size after every time you pay off a debt.

After paying off a debt, that debt is now gone. The money that you used to pay towards it, is now available to use towards paying off the next one.

Rather than basing your debt amount on how much you owe on each account or what the interest rate is, instead think about how many credit cards you have. If you have four credit cards, after paying off the first card you’re already a quarter of the way towards being debt free.

The fast results achieved when focusing on paying off your smallest balance first will motivate you to get that next debt cleared.

This method works by using psychological principles. When a person achieves a goal, like paying off that first credit card debt, the brain releases dopamine and it feels good. Another benefit of the debt snowball method is that your credit utilization ratio and credit score simultaneously improve each time a credit card balance gets paid in full.

A useful first step in advance of using this debt snowball approach is to create a budget analysis worksheet, which is basically just putting all expenses in one column and income in another.

A budget will provide you with a visual image of where your money is going, making it easier to find non-essential expenses that can be reduced or eliminated. (example: lower the electric and heat bill, use coupons when shopping to save money at the grocery store, remove the HBO that you never watch, and cancel that old subscription that you forgot was billing you each month).

The following budget and snowball calculator tool makes it much easier to find extra money in order to use the snowball method. You simply start by using the budget calculator and once you complete your budget the snowball calculator will appear–it’s all connected and super easy to use.

Click Here to Use the Budget & Snowball Calculator

Keep your credit card accounts open after paying off the balances.

If you close a credit card account, your credit score will decline because your credit utilization ratio will be negatively affected and the length of your credit history will be reduced.

2. The Debt Avalanche

see what's a faster way to pay off credit card bills, the snowball or avalanche method?

The debt avalanche method is similar to the debt snowball method, but the difference with the debt avalanche is that you order your debts by their interest rate. Instead of paying off your smallest balance first, you would pay off the credit card balance with the highest interest rate first, the one costing you the most.

By paying off your most expensive accounts first, you can get out of debt faster and maximize your savings. This option requires more will-power than the debt snowball method because it takes longer to get results, but if you stick it out and use this option to become debt free, you will end up saving more money in the end than if you were to use the debt snowball method.

You may decide to use a combination of the debt snowball and avalanche method, using the debt snowball method to motivate you. For example, pay off all of your balances that are $1,000 or less using the debt snowball method. After quickly clearing these first few small debts and getting that feeling of gratification, then switch to prioritizing your debts by the interest rate and using the debt avalanche method.

At NerdWallet.com they offer an excellent Debt avalanche calculator tool to help you get out of debt faster with this route.

3. Pay Off Credit Card Debt With a Balance Transfer Card:

“Low Rate Balance Transfers | 0% Intro APR. Apply Now!” 

Wow, that’s enticing.  … until you read the fine print; “after 12-18 months the introductory rate comes to an end, and the interest rate rises to 19.9%.” Balance transfer cards also come with up-front fees. These fees range from 3%-5% of the amount of credit card debt getting transferred. If you move $10,000 onto a balance transfer card that charges a 4% fee, that’s $400 in up-front costs.

Balance transfer cards are used by banks as a trap. They get you on the upfront fee and when you can’t pay off your entire balance during the intro period, now they can jack up the interest rates.

When is a balance transfer card worth it?

  1. If you can afford to pay the balance “in full” within the 12-18-month introductory period, you could end up paying low to no interest and only a $400 fee. Shop around for a balance transfer card that comes with low costs and only go this route if you can afford to pay the balance in full within the introductory rate period. Use this debt national calculator tool to help you do the math.
  2. Choose a balance transfer card that pays you high cash back. Bank of America offers a credit card that pays up to 3% cash back. If you transfer $50K in credit card debt onto a balance transfer card that pays you 3%, you’ll get reimbursed $1,500 in cash back. Put that $1,500 towards paying off your next credit card debt in line as you continue with the debt snowball method. You can eliminate 100% of interest and earn cash back when using a balance transfer card to pay off high-interest credit card debt.
  3. Remember to keep your credit card accounts open after paying off the balances, to keep your credit utilization ratio favorable.

4. Home Equity Line of Credit:

When using a home equity line of credit to pay off credit card debt, you’re taking on considerable risk. You’re swapping an unsecured debt for a secured debt. If for whatever reason you can’t afford to continue paying your scheduled monthly payments on the home equity line of credit, you could end up losing your home over a credit card debt, wherein you see the risk.

However, this is still one of my favorite tools for clearing credit card debt. The value of using a home equity line of credit to pay off credit card debt is that you’re eliminating high-interest credit cards, and replacing them with a low-cost home equity line of credit.

According to Bankrate.com, 5.56% is the average interest rate on a home equity line of credit as of May 2018, significantly lower than the average interest rate on a credit card.

5. How to Negotiate With Bank to Reduce Interest Rate

Negotiating directly with your creditor to reduce the interest rate and monthly payment can be a relatively simple and practical option. You may be able to convince a creditor to lower your interest rate permanently.

For example: one of my close friends recently contacted Chase bank and requested that they lower his interest rate.

“I’ll be closing my credit card account at Chase and switching to Capital One,” he said, “who offered me a 12% rate on a similar card.”  He continued, “I’ve been a loyal client for six years now, and it would be mutually beneficial for you to lower your interest rate so that I can stay with Chase.” Chase quickly approved the request and permanently lowered his interest rate from 15% to 12%.

All it took was the initiative to make a quick phone call.

Here’s a credit card payoff calculator to help you.

6. Credit Card Hardship Program with Bank

In some cases, you may only be able to get a temporary reduction in the monthly payment, but if you’re going through a financial hardship, that may be your best solution.

To be considered for a bank’s credit card hardship program, you must be behind on your monthly payment, but not to the point where your credit report is negatively affected.

Steps to get approved:

  1. The trick is to call your creditor in 7-10 days after you miss the monthly payment. Late payment history doesn’t get reported to the credit reporting agencies until you’re more than 29 days past due.
  2. To strengthen your case, send the creditor a copy of your budget analysis, a financial hardship letter and evidence to validate your reason for needing a lower payment, before calling them.
  3. When calling your creditor, request to speak to a supervisor because they have the authority to reduce your monthly payment. Let the supervisor know that you’re calling to see if they can temporarily lower your monthly payment. Go over the fact that you could not afford to make your last monthly payment and explain why. Include the details of your financial hardship. Make sure to keep your story in line with what you stated in the hardship letter. Also, reassure your creditor that your financial hardship is only temporary and provide an estimate for how long you’ll need the relief.
  4. The supervisor will ask you a series of questions about your income. At that point, verify that they received your budget analysis, hardship letter and whatever documentation you sent.

You’ll be rejected from a bank’s credit card hardship program if your income is too low, due to insufficient income. If your income is too high, they may not consider you to have a real financial hardship. There is no set number, but as a general rule of thumb, consider showing that you could reasonably afford about half of the projected monthly payment that is currently required.

7. Consumer Credit Counseling to Pay Off Credit Cards in Less Than 5 Years

After completing your budget analysis, if you find that you only have enough money to make minimum monthly payments or less, you may want to seek a debt relief program. There are several advantages to participation in a debt relief program.

A consumer credit counseling (CCC) plan may lead to lower interest rates and the consolidation of several of your monthly payments into an easier to deal with, more manageable single payment.

It’s common to see 25% interest rates get reduced to 8%-10%. Consumer credit counseling can lead a person out of credit card debt within 4-5 years, versus 9-15 years when paying minimum payments.

Although participation in CCC has a minimal effect on a person’s credit score, there may be some adverse consequences to consider.

For example, anytime you change the original terms on your credit card contract there’s an adverse effect on your credit rating, and with consumer credit counseling a third-party notation will be notated on your credit report.

8. Debt Settlement Services to Get Out Of Credit Card Debt in Under 4 Years

If your credit card debt is with a collection agency, debt settlement can reduce the balances to around half, before company fees.

Debt settlement programs can offer a solution to your debt that is affordable, and it provides you with a viable option other than bankruptcy.

Debt settlement services can help a person to pay off all of their unsecured debt in under 48 months.

Negative consequences of debt settlement include:

  • Credit scores go down and derogatory notations will appear on credit (including late and collection marks).
  • There is no guarantee that a creditor will settle at a certain percentage.
  • The IRS could require a person to pay taxes on the amount saved after a credit card settlement.
  • Late fees and interest cause credit card balances to increase before getting resolved.
  • A creditor could issue a person a summons to go to court, and although this is rare, it could happen.

9. Debt Validation Plans Last For 3 Years (average)

Before signing up for a debt settlement program, consider debt validation. The Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA) gives you the legal right to dispute a third-party debt collection account through debt validation, forcing the collection agency to prove that they have the legal authority to collect on a debt.

A recent article in BusinessInsider.com stated; “Billions of dollars in student loans may be wiped out for tens of thousands of borrowers in the US because a lender didn’t keep track of the paperwork verifying ownership of the loans.”

When a debt collection company can’t prove a person owes the debt, the debt becomes legally uncollectible – where the collector must stop collection on the debt and subsequently can no longer lawfully report the debt on a person’s credit report.

Debt Relief Program Infographic (Pros vs. Cons)

How Credit Card Debt Relief Programs Work & Affect Credit Scores?

10. Chapter 7 Bankruptcy Can Clear Credit Card Debt in Under 6 Months

As of September 20, 2018, 62% of all consumer bankruptcy filings were for Chapter 7 bankruptcy.

Why is Chapter 7 the preferred way of bankruptcy? 

The reason is that Chapter 7 bankruptcy wipes away credit card debt so that it doesn’t have to get paid.

Chapter 7 bankruptcy only lasts for 3-6 months, making this one of the fastest ways to escape credit card debt in 2019.

With chapter 7 bankruptcy (also known as “liquidation bankruptcy”) a debtor’s assets are sold, and the proceeds are used to pay off creditors. However, 95% of debtors do a “no asset filing” because they don’t have any assets to be sold. If a debtor doesn’t have any assets to get sold, their debts are discharged and no longer legally owed.

Credit cards, private student loans, medical bills, and almost all unsecured debts can get discharged and wiped away clean (excluding federal student loans, tax claims, spousal or child support, condominium and housing fees, alimony, and a few others).

Debts NOT Discharged in Chapter 7 Bankruptcy

getting out of credit card debt in 2019 with chapter 7 bankruptcy

The Downsides of Bankruptcy:

  • Your credit score can get lowered by 175 points
  • Next to each creditor that gets discharged, it will say, “debt discharged due to bankruptcy”
  • Potential employers, landlords, and creditors will all be able to see that you filed for bankruptcy
  • Credit scores will be subprime after filing for bankruptcy, making it difficult to get approved for low-interest rates on any type of credit
  • Premiums on car insurance, cell phone, and insurance monthly payments can all legally increase once bankruptcy goes on a person’s credit report
  • Chapter 7 bankruptcy can stay on your credit report for 10-years

Here’s a bankruptcy guide to help you learn more about bankruptcy if this is an option you’re seriously considering.

About the author:

Paul J Paquin is the CEO of Golden Financial Services, a national debt relief company that specializes in helping consumers achieve financial freedom and credit card relief. Paul integrates his experiences and insights from Golden Financial Services into his writing, sharing solutions to the everyday financial challenges that Americans face. Paul’s passionate about empowering consumers with the knowledge needed to improve their finances and take control of debt. He’s created numerous guides on debt related subjects; a few of the most popular include, “A Guide to Understanding Unsecured vs. Secured Debt” and “The Ultimate Guide on How to Get Student Loan Forgiveness”.

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3 comments on “10 Best Ways to Clear High Credit Card Debt in 2019

  1. https://create.piktochart.com/output/35790063-free-fire-battlegrounds-hack-2019-unlimited-diamonds-cheats
    February 7, 2019

    Great post on how to get out of debt. Thank you

  2. Nancy Ann
    May 26, 2019

    Hello everyone, im from Missouri USA, I have been struggling looking for a means of getting a loan for the past 4 months, I have searched a lot of companies. I needed a loan of $47,000 to set up a business and settle my bills as well as take care of my children. I can’t get approved for a loan anywhere, what should I do?

    • May 31, 2019

      Hello Nancy, you mentioned that you need a loan to settle your bills, are these collection accounts? If so, I would recommend you use debt validation to dispute the collection accounts in an effort to get them off your credit report. Don’t just dispute the debts through the credit reporting agency because they can easily get validated and will then show an unsuccessful dispute had occurred, further damaging your credit score. Validation could resolve the debts and potentially lead to them coming off your credit report if the collection agencies can’t prove the debts are valid. If the debts are proven to be valid they could always get settled for about half of the amount owed if the collection agency agrees to remove the debt from your credit entirely upon payment received on the settlement. You can get a free credit report at annualcreditreport.com and then have one of our specialists take a look at it for you and see what your best options would be. The debt validation program won’t charge you anything if the account is proven valid so it can’t hurt to give it a try!